Ever been to the Michigan village of Hallock? Ever even heard of it? Possibly not, as it really doesn’t exist anymore. There are a few homes in the area and some people might disagree, but as of the 1920s, Hallock officially became non-existent.

Hallock was founded as a lumber town in 1906 in Otsego County’s Elmira Township. It was named after a farmer by the name of Benjamin Hallock. Why? Because he let the Boyne City-Gaylord-Alpena Railroad pass through his property; so as a way of thanking him, the village was named after him.

Also in 1906, Hallock got its own post office, operated by first postmaster Arthur Bruce. The P.O. ran from June 27, 1906 until it shut down for good on April 15, 1914. By 1928, the village was no longer. The businesses were gone and even the buildings disappeared.

In that short time – just 22 years – the village of Hallock had the Badger Woodenware Company, Boyne City Chemical Company, church, feed & saw mill, two general stores, grocery, potato warehouse, railroad depot, recreation hall, and schoolhouse…..and they’re ALL GONE.

The residents seemed to enjoy life in Hallock – they had picnics, recitals, band concerts, dances, club meetings, socials…..with such activity from the townspeople, it’s sad that the whole town just withered away. As with the majority of small Michigan lumber towns, once the timber ran out, people and businesses left in droves.

In 1928 the “town” was sold for $10 – a dollar a piece for ten lots…with nothing but grass and weeds left. Nowadays it’s just farmland.

A drive to the intersection of Hallock Rd. and Parmater Road will take you to where Hallock’s former downtown was. Turn west and at the ripped-up railroad tracks is where the business section was. But you would never know it.

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