It may not be a question that keeps you up at night, but odds are, that you are curious how a business in Michigan qualifies for their logos to go up on those Michigan service exit signs on the freeway.

How Do You Get Your Logo on A Service Exit Sign?

Google Maps
Google Maps
loading...

Here in Michigan, there are a few requirements to actually get your business featured on these signs.

For starters, if you are a gas station, food, or a place of lodging, you must be at least six miles away from the exit of the highway ramp. A pharmacy must be a distance of a 3-miles from an off-ramp, and campsites are allowed to be roughly 15 miles from an exit ramp.

The Blue Service Signs Get Further In-Depth With Rules

While your businesses may not think to meet these requirements, there are more additional requirements than just distance if you want your business on one of those signs.

Google Maps
Google Maps
loading...

If you're a food service establishment, you must operate a minimum of 12 hours a day, and are open at least six days a week.

If you own a gas station, you must operate at least 16 hours a day, are open seven days a week, and operate a minimum of 360 days in the year.

First Come First Serve, Or Closest To The Highway?

Here in the state of Michigan, you're actually more likely to get your businesses featured on these signs if you're the one closest to the highway...

Google Maps
Google Maps
loading...

Are There Costs & Fees To The Blue Signs?

This one actually caught me by surprise a bit. You do, in fact, have to pay to get your business on these signs, however, it is not a one-time fee.

According to the Michigan Interstate Logos website, to keep your logo on one of these blue signs, you have to pay roughly $800 a year. And that's just on one side of the highway. It's an additional $800 if you want both north and southbound directions to show your business's logo.

Michigan Man Created the Four-Way Traffic Light, 1920

Included is a gallery of vintage traffic lights

LOOK: See how much gasoline cost the year you started driving

To find out more about how has the price of gas changed throughout the years, Stacker ran the numbers on the cost of a gallon of gasoline for each of the last 84 years. Using data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (released in April 2020), we analyzed the average price for a gallon of unleaded regular gasoline from 1976 to 2020 along with the Consumer Price Index (CPI) for unleaded regular gasoline from 1937 to 1976, including the absolute and inflation-adjusted prices for each year.

Read on to explore the cost of gas over time and rediscover just how much a gallon was when you first started driving.

Classic Cigarette Vending Machines

Cigarette smoking is slowly becoming a thing of the past but here are some remnants of a time when smoking was widely accepted.

There are lots of different types of cigarette vending machines from back in the day that you won't see in a restaurant or in front of a store anymore.