This has been an ongoing issue for quite some time now. There is a major global semiconductor shortage which has been causing thousands of new vehicles to sit idle for quite some time now.

Have you noticed more recently driving down Mt. Hope road near Michigan State University, there were hundreds of new vehicles sitting in parking spaces at MSU waiting for these semiconductor parts?

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According to mlive.com:

GM said in a statement Tuesday, Aug. 3, that its truck plants in Flint; Silac, Mexico; and Fort Wayne, Ind., will stop production during the week of Aug. 9, and restart full production on Aug. 16.

Locally however, General Motors Delta Township plant will shut down as well during the week of August 9. The Delta plant is well known for building the Chevrolet Traverse and the Buick Enclave, two beautiful vehicles.

This is a world wide semiconductor shortage and it is very complex. Have you also noticed when you drive past car dealerships that you only see used cars?

Without these semiconductors, new vehicles will not be sold anytime soon. I went into one of my favorite local car dealerships just a few weeks ago and they couldn't give me an answer as to when they will start selling new cars again due to this important vehicle part.

Mlive.com also adds:

"The recent scheduling adjustments have been driven by temporary parts shortages caused by semiconductor supply constraints from international markets experiencing COVID-19 related restrictions. This period will provide us with the opportunity to complete unfinished vehicles at the impacted assembly plants and ship those units to dealers to help meet the strong customer demand for our products."

All we can say is good luck to all GM assembly plants and we hope this issue can be resolved sooner than later.

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