Scientists are keeping an eye on a MASSIVE Sun Spot that could result in the Northern Lights making an appearance in the Michigan skies soon.

Spaceweather.com is anxiously watching a sun spot that doubled in size in just two days. The spots are cool points on the sun's surface that, if disrupted, could release solar flares. This particular sun spot is pointed directly at Earth (for now).

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Sunspot AR3038 is visible in the center of this image by NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory. /NASA SDO
Sunspot AR3038 is visible in the center of this image by NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory. /NASA SDO
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Given the known factors right now, any solar flare released would be considered "Medium" in strength. The flare would impact Earth only a few minutes later.

The only disruption a flare of this size might bring would be temporary radio outages at the poles of the planet as the radiation from the flare would impact our planet's atmosphere.

But the result of solar flares on Earth are often accompanied with beautiful views, especially in the northern parts of the United States, which Michigan happens to be in!

When/if this Sun Spot does collapse, and it's trajectory toward Earth holds, Parts of Michigan could see an amazing display of the Aurora Borealis, aka the "Northern Lights."

If you've never had the pleasure of seeing the Northern Lights, they are an experience that photos and videos simply can't describe. The sheer size and beauty of the color in the sky is unmatched by anything, except maybe the "Southern Lights" that occur in the South Pole.

At the moment, no timetable is available for when this might happen, but Spaceweather.com is keeping an eye on the sunspot.

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